Mossy Oak 995 leg rig

Sewn up a 4x Redball 20rd mag leg panel for a customer in 500D Nylon pack cloth in Mossy Oak New Breakup camouflage;

Velcro retention straps

1.5″ buckles and straps for all 4 straps

pleated magazine pockets

added eyelets for drainage; painted because the Dritz paint was very fragile

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view of the carrier

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Drainage eyelets

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Velcro retention straps with Olive green pull loops

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Detail of adjusting end with loops for strap retention on leg straps

 

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Detail of belt loops with adjusters pulled at their maximum. Belt loops accommodate up to 2.5″ webbing such as USGI pistol belts or riggers belts.

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Bushcraft USA 10×10 tarp set ups and one tree hammock hanging system!

Recently acquired a Bushcraft Outfitters, USA (BCUSA) 10 ft by 10 ft coyote tarp in a forum deal! It was damaged with a tab broken off, I got the tab repaired… anyhow… DSCN2338

Coyote Brown BCUSA tarp in brown stuff sack next to el-cheapo pencil organizer that houses my lighter smaller Long Ogee tarp.

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Damaged tab repaired, I used 1″ Cross- Grain ribbon as the reinforcement material and stitched lines to make sure it aint ever coming off!

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Initial set up, Diamond fly configuration with ski poles, 2 stakes only! a little slack in the material but that’s expected of nylon fabric..

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With two hammocks, more than enough space in there…. I know, I hung the hammocks too low like low hanging fruit but it’s just to give one an impression of the space available..

And with this tarp, I’ve decided I wanted to see how it would look in a vastly different configuration than most of the normal square tarp set ups…the basic layout is the same for the next 3 set ups, just the differences are all in the ridge line tie out location and the configuration of the front opening.

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Front view of the tarp tent set up;

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Back view of the set up, What I did is to stake the back wall down first, and then square up the side corners so that the tabs, which are evenly spaced at 2.5 ft between tie out tabs, are able to be staked down at the same locations, and then from that point between the center and the outermost stake, line up the front corners of the shelter to make a rectangle floor print of 5 ft wide and 7.5 feet long.

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Side view. After I stake the sides/corners down, I then raised the front peak up as far as I could do, and then attached the two tarp clips at the points where I wanted to raise the roof/wall points on the back, to make for a nearly vertical rear wall, and then ran the lines to the ski poles and staked them down. Finally, I run the clothesline ridge line through the ridge seam tabs on the tarp and raised the rear peak up, and tied the end of the line to an overhanging branch. This in effect gives the shelter a house like roof from which rainwater will shed very well, and with the vertical walls, gives one a feeling of increased space compared to a typical A- frame.

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Having seen something similar on a same size tarp, I decided to see if it would work with the ridge line peak tie out moved back 2.5 feet to the next tie out tab on the ridge seam..and bungee’d the resulting corners to bring the front down as far as I could… I disliked this set up because it robs the interior of space, and essentially makes it more a shelter you can only lay diagonally, as opposed to straight up and down.

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Another view of the terrible layout. It might be OK if I had done this with the back being a normal A-frame back though.

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So, keeping the same ridge line tab tied out, I decided to see what would happen if I pulled the corners the other way..and supported them with leaning poles and guy lines… this was the result. A much much better set up, and one that gives me the most spacious feel of the interior, PLUS the protection from almost all angles, the front opening is only 2.5 feet tall and 5 feet wide, a poncho or a small 5×7 tarp folded in half would have provided a great awning/door..One could also put a small piece of bug netting on that area and be fine for bug season…

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The side view of it. It is essentially now a doghouse shaped shelter, and with the amount of room up front now that the gable is pulled further out, one could have a good space for cooking/gear and still be protected from the elements inside.

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Rear view of the Doghouse shelter, again it is showing the rear wall layout, but also, you can see how much more open the front part looks to be compared to the first triangular opening shelter.. And the only two changes from that is the relocation of the ridge line peak tie out point and the addition of two tie out/pole points on the front sides.

With the tarp clips relocated to exactly 2.5 ft from the corners and in line with the side tabs and the ridge tab, I would say the shelter is basically a small wall tent with a front opening.
And now for something quite different! Here’s the one tree hammock stand!

One Tree Hammock stand stuff

First, these are the materials you need, from top to bottom;

a hammock obviously, with suspension.

an USGI General Purpose, Medium Tent center pole, telescoping, and it goes out to 10something feet, so if you ever need to have a visual cue on “not touching this with a 10ft pole”, this is it!

then the camo straps which are for both the hammock attachment and a ridge line in between the one tree and the pole,

then finally, a set of 4 cargo straps with 10″ nail style stakes larksheaded to their ends and tied to each other at their centers.

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Hook up the ridge line with the camo straps, then position army pole, only extended halfway, then run the 4 green straps down to the ground, and nail them securely at a 45 degree angle.. the pole is not vertical, because that is not what you want, you want as much of the hammock load to be on the pole, and less on the lines, so angling the pole out that its around 50-60 degrees from vertical, and then make sure its not going anywhere.. then stake the lines as far as possible.. this in effect gives you a tension based system..

finally, hook up the hammock to the pole and tree strap.

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Another view of the system, with my massive lumbar pack hanging off a steel hook I mounted on the tree strap. Sharp eyed readers will note that I have a whoopie sling in between the two straps on the ridge line, this is to make it easy to maintain tension…

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With the 10×10 tarp set up in an almost ordinary set up… first I put the side up with the poles, then I staked the center of the other side to make a half-diamond shape..then I staked out the “door” sides on the covered side. This gives me a good balance of wind proofing from one side, and yet a nice porch mode on the other side… with the amount of space in there, I can have a 2nd hammock underneath if I dare do so, or an army cot, or a camp chair or two..

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Side view of the set up. I did not stake the lefthand door as close to the ground as the other side is, but it still works here. With the short hammock ridge line, the 10 ft tarp covers me very well…only problem is the gear hanging out in the rain, but a poncho over it will give it the protection it needs.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

ALICE frame modular stuff sack pack system;

Decided to see what the MOLLE compression panels could take, and set up a backpack system in which the main bag is removable and contains all of my hammock camping gear cept tarp and suspension tree straps!

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Pack with everything loaded onto it

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Side view with hatchet mounted

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Other side view with knife and flashlight

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Bottom view, that is a vintage M1967 sleep system carrier being used as the bottom panel.

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Suspension view. Even though this frame is obsolete, and usually not comfortable with ALICE packs…it works pretty good for this load because of the packing system.

The pack contains the following items;

In the WW2 laundry bag stuff sack;

hammock

under pad

bug net

Kelty top quilt

In each of the 4x USMC Coyote brown pouches;

First aid kit (marked with red cross)

cook set and fire kit

food

back up hammock/gear hammock (Grand Trunk UltraLite)

In the MOLLE Water bottle carriers are the water bottles (self explanatory)

USGI M16 pouches carries my tarp in one, and hammock suspension in other

IDF revolver ammo/handcuff pouch houses my compass

Green Buttpack up top carries my clothes for up to 3 days

horizontal MOLLE pouch on very top carries my stakes, cordage, bandannas.

I do have room enough in the WW2 laundry bag to carry more insulation if I need to.

I notice that the MOLLE compression panels will likely need a 3rd buckle in the middle, and 2 more straps to attach to the frame, so that it compresses better around the main stuff sack.

Trip report; Slide Creek camping

SO I am back from a weekend camping out in Slide Creek area in Oregon, part of the Santiam State Forest/Willamette National Forest; a weekend with friends, and a test of the Bat Wing tarp and DIY hammock! I must say, I had a great time!DSCN1852The view of the camp site; my hammock tarp is somewhere to the right in the woods;

DSCN1853Slide Creek from the camp site

DSCN1854My hammock tarp camp site; the trees are barely over 12 feet apart; and I only used two stakes; tied the corners of the ends to the trees

DSCN1855with vinyl ground cloth and my pack and Gilmour bow saw to process dead fall wood for fire

DSCN1876The view inside the tarp; that is my USGI Intermediate Cold weather sleeping bag; I have a blue camp pad inside to keep me insulated on the bottom.

DSCN1856looking out to the parking area and National Forest Road 4695; which leads to Brietenbush Road

DSCN1857a trail going into the woods; beautiful scenery!

DSCN1858the Sun shining through;

DSCN1867here be life and dead wood; such is beautiful woodland.

DSCN1864the natural bridge made by felled trees; these trees fell down from a windstorm a while back, a few have been cut in order to provide some firewood; but the majority are left alone

DSCN1866the root base of one of the bridging trees; it is a large base, and provides a good shelter for animals and critters; the ground is so very rocky

DSCN1868one of the Russula mushrooms; I am not sure which species of Russula this one is;

DSCN1870a Western Trillium that’s aged; it is a beautiful flowering plant

DSCN1873a Fairy Slipper; one of the native Orchids in the Oregon/Pacific NW woodlands

DSCN1871a small tree sprouting out of a large dead stump

DSCN1872further up Slide creek; there is evidence of rock slides and bank erosion from storms

DSCN1878A couple of Harlequin Ducks!

DSCN1879another shot of the Harlequin Ducks

DSCN1860Bushcrafting with my vintage Colonial Bowie

DSCN1861and again with the Buck 103 Skinner; making great curling chips

DSCN1863making a tinder stick with the Imperial Ireland small knife

DSCN1875making another tinder stick with the Imperial R.I. bowie knife; it carves pretty good on white pine

DSCN1859A cup of hot chocolate over an Esbit stove

DSCN1862the campground fire pit; modified a little bit so that there’s a draft and a way to feed the large logs into the fire; they are all dead fall/dead logs

The weather was a typical Oregon springtime weather; spots of sun and lots of showers, overnight temps went down to the 40s; and I was toasty warm in the USGI Intermediate Cold Mummy bag and pad; the tarp kept me and my gear dry!

Redid my hammock shelter into a minimalist tarp!

SO like the previous post said, my attempt failed at an integrated hammock shelter/bug shelter/ under cover…….

so I took it all apart, and did a few sketches and made a plan; Bat-Wing Tarp designIts based off of Hammock Forums’ member Gargoyle’s Ogee Tarp; and built using just the 55″x144″ material I have on hand;

it is now a very light, compact tarp, I will need to redo my hammock suspension so that I can put the tarp closer to the body of the hammock..

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 1the tarp over my hammock, it looks like a bat wing doesn’t it!?Bat-Wing Tarp Design 2angled view of the tarp

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 3head on view of the tarp, yes it is narrow, and that is the door/beak corner system

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 4 Close Upclose up of the triangle parts, I have an extra tie out there in case I want to do a tent pole spreader mod so that it opens up more on the inside.

Bat-Wing Tarp and Hammock  belt kitthe whole system; I now need to figure out the stakes/guy line situation as to how to pack them without getting the hammock dirty..,might use an USGI M16 cleaning kit pouch? the pouch on the far right holds my tarp, yes that is right, it packs down ridiculously small! the SAW ammo pouch holds the hammock, and the other small pouch holds the suspension parts, these two small pouches were my prototypes for the SKS ammo clip pouches.

 

Hammock Shelter; SIlnylon and Ripstop and No See Um mesh….whoops!

Well here we go!

Sewn up another hammock shelter; this time out of 4 yards of Silicon impregnated nylon and 4 yards of Durable Water Repellent Nylon ; and two triangles of No See Um mesh; DSCN1841First hang; no weight in the hammock, it looks OK…a little IFFY on the triangle windows..

DSCN1842Triangle windows of no see um mesh. You can see the stress being put on the top of the triangle from the hammock suspension..and this is unloaded hammock.

 

so after putting SOME weight in the hammock, it ripped where one of the triangle windows were……SO…. looks like I will be taking the windows off, and then trying again and see if it will still work…..if not, then take it all apart and sew on another 4 yards of Silicon Nylon and make a 12 ft long rectangle tarp with no bottom parts or anything.

 

 

Made my own tarp……learnt new things….

 

Sewn up the material I got from ebay, uncoated woodland ripstop…. after cutting it….well… i did a horrible job cutting it…

the original tarp plan called for an asymmetric hex tarp that used 18 ft of 64″ wide material, and has a 9 ft 9 1/2 inches seam…..with a 12+ ft ridge line…well, somehow I mis-cut somewhere and ended up with a nearly symmetric tarp with the 10 ft 6 inches seam..

Lesson 1; confirm the material’s length. I assumed 6 yards, clearly it is more than 6 yards if the 126″ seam is any indicator… it IS 64″ wide material though.

Lesson 2; get a proper cutting mat big enough and a big enough table……..

Lesson 3; use Catenary curves and cut to curves for maximum tension……
Lesson 4; measure twice, maybe thrice before cutting, and confirm the orientation of the end cuts!
DIY Hex Tarp 1

first set up with seam on diagonal; decent coverage….

DIY Hex Tarp 2quarter view; yes theres floppy edges on the tarp…

DIY Hex Tarp 3view inside…there’s room….its a little wonky looking thing though..

DIY Hex Tarp 4second set up…ridge line is way too long….less coverage too…hmm.

DIY Hex Tarp 5not as much coverage…..although..for the view, it can’t be beat!

DIY Hex Tarp 6Ah that’s more like it! shorter ridge line, 126″ seam, so 126″ ridge line….while theres less end coverage, it still covers the whole hammock, positioned right over the quick links of the hammock suspension to tree straps. And theres more coverage on the sides, so in case of hard rain, it protects more of the person in the hammock!

DIY Hex Tarp 7quarter view, you can see how much wider it is, and how much it covers the ground..

DIY Hex Tarp 8another view, with the black harness clipped to the tree strap. the brown pouch is what holds the tarp, the large green pouch holds the hammock.