MOLLE Yucca Pack, modded to a big Lumbar pack!

My small MOLLE Yucca daypack is now doing duty as a beefy lumbar pack on a MOLLE waist belt set up and H harness set up… the main modifications involved were very extensive, basically a whole panel of MOLLE webbing on the back of the pack, plus 4 Ladder-loc buckles at specific locations to function better as a lumbar pack.. With some adjustment on how I attached my MOLLE Sustainment Pouches, I found that it functions better, and gives me some space in the main sack and on the outside… instead of taking up all 12 MOLLE slots on the perimeter for the two Sustainment Pouches, I have spaced it so that each pouch only takes up 5 slots each (for 10 slots), and a gap of 2 MOLLE slots in between for my Nalgene carrier and small misc item pouch. This also provides me with a convenient route for the flap straps..

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The pack. The top stuff sack houses my hammock and bugnet and suspension, while the MOLLE Sustainment pouches each hold the kelty topquilt and the hammock under pad insulation, and the main sack holds my clothing. The nalgene carrier in the lower middle houses an IKEA kitchen caddy turned into a wood burning stove, and the Buschraft Outfitters 10×10 silnylon tarp in Coyote brown.

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View of the waist belt set up; the large pouch holds my food and cook set, while the smaller pouch holds my first aid kit and fire kit, then between the canteen and the pouches are two modified 40mm ammo pouches, one holds my 4.5″ blade knife, the other holds a small 2AA Angle-head flashlight. Obviously there are two water bottles on the belt at the kidney positions.

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Belt opened up, you can see how there’s quite a bit of padding, the belt pad is size Medium, and is basically perfect as a waist belt on this pack system. You can also see the suspension straps for the pack.

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The MOLLE panel for the back, Instead of a normal method of alternating straps, I decided to fill the whole panel with butted straps so that I have basically as many options for attaching it to whatever I want to.

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The upper harness attachment system, what it is, is essentially a load lifter system, the pack’s D-rings are the anchors, while the harness adjuster only serves to locate the top point, and the Ladder-locs on the flap is the main adjusting point.. because I do not have internal stays on the pack, this method is needed to get the pack to ride as close to the back as possible.

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For those wondering how’d I attach the pack to the waistbelt… these are the 4 5″ long MOLLE straps I made up from the scraps I have on hand.

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A pic of the modified 40mm pouch, the only mods needed is the addition of a snap below the original snap to enable me to securely close the flap for better retention of the knife.

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Made my own tarp……learnt new things….

 

Sewn up the material I got from ebay, uncoated woodland ripstop…. after cutting it….well… i did a horrible job cutting it…

the original tarp plan called for an asymmetric hex tarp that used 18 ft of 64″ wide material, and has a 9 ft 9 1/2 inches seam…..with a 12+ ft ridge line…well, somehow I mis-cut somewhere and ended up with a nearly symmetric tarp with the 10 ft 6 inches seam..

Lesson 1; confirm the material’s length. I assumed 6 yards, clearly it is more than 6 yards if the 126″ seam is any indicator… it IS 64″ wide material though.

Lesson 2; get a proper cutting mat big enough and a big enough table……..

Lesson 3; use Catenary curves and cut to curves for maximum tension……
Lesson 4; measure twice, maybe thrice before cutting, and confirm the orientation of the end cuts!
DIY Hex Tarp 1

first set up with seam on diagonal; decent coverage….

DIY Hex Tarp 2quarter view; yes theres floppy edges on the tarp…

DIY Hex Tarp 3view inside…there’s room….its a little wonky looking thing though..

DIY Hex Tarp 4second set up…ridge line is way too long….less coverage too…hmm.

DIY Hex Tarp 5not as much coverage…..although..for the view, it can’t be beat!

DIY Hex Tarp 6Ah that’s more like it! shorter ridge line, 126″ seam, so 126″ ridge line….while theres less end coverage, it still covers the whole hammock, positioned right over the quick links of the hammock suspension to tree straps. And theres more coverage on the sides, so in case of hard rain, it protects more of the person in the hammock!

DIY Hex Tarp 7quarter view, you can see how much wider it is, and how much it covers the ground..

DIY Hex Tarp 8another view, with the black harness clipped to the tree strap. the brown pouch is what holds the tarp, the large green pouch holds the hammock.

 

 

Duck hunter camo hammock shelter, no ground stakes!

 

 

 

 

So I read up on a Vietnam hammock system in which the poncho is tied above the hammock, and the corners are spread apart using a locally sourced stick on each end..and decided to try this with 4 tent pole sections and L stakes inserted in the tent pole ends…it works in a fashion….only issue I felt and seen, is that of wind buffeting the shelter… with wind, its like a kite because only two points on the shelter are fixed, whereas the rest are free standing so to speak….. unless one has a weight on the bottom portion of the shelter, maybe a pack or shoes, I think it would be better to just run lines to the ground stakes and not use the tent pole sections..

DSCN1777side view, it looks like the shelter is too short, thats perspective due to the wind pushing down one side and causing the corner to pitch up

DSCN17743/4 view, you can see how the tent poles are above the hammock. I am able to get into the shelter and zip it up from the inside

DSCN1775L stake inserted into one end of tent pole, through the corner grommet

DSCN1776head on view of the system, there’s enough room to allow me to lay on a diagonal, and the bottom part prevents wind from chilling my underquilt (not shown)