Bushcraft USA 10×10 tarp set ups and one tree hammock hanging system!

Recently acquired a Bushcraft Outfitters, USA (BCUSA) 10 ft by 10 ft coyote tarp in a forum deal! It was damaged with a tab broken off, I got the tab repaired… anyhow… DSCN2338

Coyote Brown BCUSA tarp in brown stuff sack next to el-cheapo pencil organizer that houses my lighter smaller Long Ogee tarp.

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Damaged tab repaired, I used 1″ Cross- Grain ribbon as the reinforcement material and stitched lines to make sure it aint ever coming off!

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Initial set up, Diamond fly configuration with ski poles, 2 stakes only! a little slack in the material but that’s expected of nylon fabric..

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With two hammocks, more than enough space in there…. I know, I hung the hammocks too low like low hanging fruit but it’s just to give one an impression of the space available..

And with this tarp, I’ve decided I wanted to see how it would look in a vastly different configuration than most of the normal square tarp set ups…the basic layout is the same for the next 3 set ups, just the differences are all in the ridge line tie out location and the configuration of the front opening.

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Front view of the tarp tent set up;

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Back view of the set up, What I did is to stake the back wall down first, and then square up the side corners so that the tabs, which are evenly spaced at 2.5 ft between tie out tabs, are able to be staked down at the same locations, and then from that point between the center and the outermost stake, line up the front corners of the shelter to make a rectangle floor print of 5 ft wide and 7.5 feet long.

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Side view. After I stake the sides/corners down, I then raised the front peak up as far as I could do, and then attached the two tarp clips at the points where I wanted to raise the roof/wall points on the back, to make for a nearly vertical rear wall, and then ran the lines to the ski poles and staked them down. Finally, I run the clothesline ridge line through the ridge seam tabs on the tarp and raised the rear peak up, and tied the end of the line to an overhanging branch. This in effect gives the shelter a house like roof from which rainwater will shed very well, and with the vertical walls, gives one a feeling of increased space compared to a typical A- frame.

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Having seen something similar on a same size tarp, I decided to see if it would work with the ridge line peak tie out moved back 2.5 feet to the next tie out tab on the ridge seam..and bungee’d the resulting corners to bring the front down as far as I could… I disliked this set up because it robs the interior of space, and essentially makes it more a shelter you can only lay diagonally, as opposed to straight up and down.

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Another view of the terrible layout. It might be OK if I had done this with the back being a normal A-frame back though.

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So, keeping the same ridge line tab tied out, I decided to see what would happen if I pulled the corners the other way..and supported them with leaning poles and guy lines… this was the result. A much much better set up, and one that gives me the most spacious feel of the interior, PLUS the protection from almost all angles, the front opening is only 2.5 feet tall and 5 feet wide, a poncho or a small 5×7 tarp folded in half would have provided a great awning/door..One could also put a small piece of bug netting on that area and be fine for bug season…

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The side view of it. It is essentially now a doghouse shaped shelter, and with the amount of room up front now that the gable is pulled further out, one could have a good space for cooking/gear and still be protected from the elements inside.

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Rear view of the Doghouse shelter, again it is showing the rear wall layout, but also, you can see how much more open the front part looks to be compared to the first triangular opening shelter.. And the only two changes from that is the relocation of the ridge line peak tie out point and the addition of two tie out/pole points on the front sides.

With the tarp clips relocated to exactly 2.5 ft from the corners and in line with the side tabs and the ridge tab, I would say the shelter is basically a small wall tent with a front opening.
And now for something quite different! Here’s the one tree hammock stand!

One Tree Hammock stand stuff

First, these are the materials you need, from top to bottom;

a hammock obviously, with suspension.

an USGI General Purpose, Medium Tent center pole, telescoping, and it goes out to 10something feet, so if you ever need to have a visual cue on “not touching this with a 10ft pole”, this is it!

then the camo straps which are for both the hammock attachment and a ridge line in between the one tree and the pole,

then finally, a set of 4 cargo straps with 10″ nail style stakes larksheaded to their ends and tied to each other at their centers.

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Hook up the ridge line with the camo straps, then position army pole, only extended halfway, then run the 4 green straps down to the ground, and nail them securely at a 45 degree angle.. the pole is not vertical, because that is not what you want, you want as much of the hammock load to be on the pole, and less on the lines, so angling the pole out that its around 50-60 degrees from vertical, and then make sure its not going anywhere.. then stake the lines as far as possible.. this in effect gives you a tension based system..

finally, hook up the hammock to the pole and tree strap.

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Another view of the system, with my massive lumbar pack hanging off a steel hook I mounted on the tree strap. Sharp eyed readers will note that I have a whoopie sling in between the two straps on the ridge line, this is to make it easy to maintain tension…

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With the 10×10 tarp set up in an almost ordinary set up… first I put the side up with the poles, then I staked the center of the other side to make a half-diamond shape..then I staked out the “door” sides on the covered side. This gives me a good balance of wind proofing from one side, and yet a nice porch mode on the other side… with the amount of space in there, I can have a 2nd hammock underneath if I dare do so, or an army cot, or a camp chair or two..

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Side view of the set up. I did not stake the lefthand door as close to the ground as the other side is, but it still works here. With the short hammock ridge line, the 10 ft tarp covers me very well…only problem is the gear hanging out in the rain, but a poncho over it will give it the protection it needs.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

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Tarp Shelter layouts and set ups!

Decided to go and do several different tarp shelter designs and layouts with the 5×7 tarp, Bat wing tarp, 9×7 tarp, and the latest 10×14 tarp I recently got!

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Flying Diamond pitch, Harbor Freight 5×7 tarp;

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Windward side view, first, tie upper corner to tree or post, then stake diagonal opposing corner down, then stake remaining two corners to make a wind break

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Another view of the Flying Diamond pitch with the 5×7 tarp, it does not provide much protection from rain, but is good for sun shade and possibly as a fire reflector using a pole to support the high corner.

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Batwing tarp in a symmetric diamond pitch with doors staked out on one side.

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Quarter view on windward side, the doors on the ground corner have been folded under, thus turning this tarp into a rhombus of 9 ft ridge line and 7 ft width.

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Head on windward view, the rhombus shape is all too readily apparent here, I think this is a good one man shelter, maybe two if the two people like cuddling together.

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Detail of doors on the pole side. Since the doors are not exactly vertical from the peak, they will go out past the pole or tree, and I might add tarp tie outs on the junction between the doors and the sides, so as to provide a place to stake out further, or suspend between two poles or trees.

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Another 5×7 tarp set up, Low Tetra pyramid…or “Dead Man’s bivy bag” set up due to its tiny size.

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The height of this is around 30 inches, while the width is 60 inches at the far end, and a floor length of 7 feet. This is NOT an ideal shelter for tall people, but for the average user or shorter, it would be a survivable shelter with protection from most elements.

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Windward view, one could make it feel bigger by adding a tie out/panel pull out where the sticker is on this tarp.

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Half-Pyramid open faced shelter utilizing the tan 9×7 tarp and suspended from a Douglas Fir branch.

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Windward view of the tarp shelter

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Tree side view, that is a 5×7 tarp as the ground cover, and there is plenty of room in there for up to 3 people. Best with two and gear, and with a metal pole or similar, one could have a fire in front of the pyramid shelter and be comfortable.

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Interior view with ground cloth and my MOLLE pack in there.

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10×14 tarp set up in a 6×8 narrow pyramid with approx 7 ft height.

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View of door side with door flaps closed up.

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Interior view showing the basic fold of corners and the space given.

Basically one puts tarp clips 3 feet from the corner of the door flaps, for the front, and then put tarp clips an approximate distance (in this case, 4 feet) from the corners on the back to make a 6 ft width between the back two clips, and thus providing just around 8 ft of length between the front and the back after squaring up the stake points.

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With 9×12 tarp erected using 5 more pole sections as an awning.

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Not quite lined up I know, but this gives good space under which to dine or cook or hang around in weather.

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A different pyramid set up, this oddly enough gives me a bigger floor space than the narrow one above, the doors are now 4 feet wide, and the back edge is now 8 feet wide..there is a 6×8 tarp in there, and according to my calculations and confirmed with this set up, I have a floor of 8 ft wide and 6 feet 6 inches length, thus providing me with more useful room in the shelter. Same 7 ft approximate height.

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Closed up, basically weather proof. I could cut a hole in there for a stovepipe but I do not have a stove with pipe yet.

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Side view of Leaning/half Pyramid set up.

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Windward-quarter view, showing the better pyramid shaping compared to the narrow one.

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All packed up save for the pole. I might splurge for a backpacking tarp pole if it means a smaller package than that shown above. Both the 10×14 tarp and the 6×8 ground tarp are rolled up in the bag, along with the stakes and the single long line.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

Two Shelter set ups!

Acquired a pair of USGI Shelter Halves, no poles nor stakes, but that was OK with me, as I have poles and stakes to spare…..decided to set up the USGI shelter halves in a format similar to the Whelen Lean-To shelters, and decided to set up the 9×12 poly tarp in a pyramid format with two long poles….DSCN2090

the USGI Whelen lean to set up. If I acquire another shelter half fabric piece, I could cut the triangles off and use those to fill in the gaps on the above set up…and have the rectangle become a small floor piece..

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Another view of the shelter, from the side. it uses 10 stakes and 6 guy lines…a lot of lines indeed.

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Back view of shelter. it is room enough for two to lay in, so it would be a good campfire shelter..might be covered more with the addition of the two triangles if I find a 3rd shelter half.

And here is the 9×12 pyramid shelter set up; it is very spacious inside, and can comfortably sleep 3 persons…or two people and a weeks worth of gear.

DSCN2088Two long poles in a bipod/scissors form, 4 stakes total and entrance could be covered by an USGI poncho tied to the two stakes and the peak. The format is simply that it is suspended at the center of the 12 ft side, so there is 6 feet between the center and the door corner stakes, and it is a little less than 9 feet from door stake to the corner stakes…as that is the 9 ft side..with that much space, one could put two cots, or an air mattress.. and still have plenty of room.

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view from the side, one could in theory put a tie out using a pebble in the middle of the long triangle panel, and pull it out to provide more room if needed.

 

 

 

Hammock Shelter/Bivy and tarp group shelters, Vintage hiking pack

 

SO I scored a vintage Academy Broadway Jasper hiking pack from a thrift store for cheap, and modified the straps and belt to better fit me…. It is pretty useful, and very roomy..more room than the ALICE Medium packs I own. I loaded it up and put on my MSS bag with the ECW Intermediate bag and Hammock Underquilt on the bottom, there is still room in main compartment for food and such, small pockets hold fire starting kit and folding stove, along with straps and cordage. Pictures are of the pack with the Coleman PEAK 1 and the ALICE medium for comparison. DSCN1724 DSCN1725 DSCN1726 DSCN1727 DSCN1728 DSCN1731 DSCN1732 DSCN1733 DSCN1734

 

Below is my group shelter, with a 12×9 tarp as main panel, and 3 9×7 tarps as floor and side panels, it is roomy and can accommodate up to 6 people, probably more comfortable for 4. ideally, it would be split into 4 packs for 4 people, so as not to overburden one person with all 4 tarps. DSCN1748 DSCN1749And here is the 12×9 tarp as a hammock shelter; pitched A frame with porch, and with a 9×7 tarp on ground (folded lengthwise) as ground sheet.

DSCN1723And here is another shelter, a duck hunter camo bivy, at first I didn’t know how it was really supposed to set up, until I set it up the way that it was originally set up and noticed that one edge was supposed to be sewn to another edge, so I added a 70″ zipper to that edge to enable it to become a hammock shelter as well as a bivy shelter. it is 8 ft long on the top portion, just shy of 6 feet on the width of the top, and 6 ft long on the bottom, and same width as the top. Below are the first set up pictures, you can see the open edge and the 3 corner grommets that puzzled me until I added the zipper to it.

DSCN1750 DSCN1751 DSCN1752 DSCN1753Sewn zipper to the open edge, and set it up, turns out the grommets on the corners were so that it could become doors, and thus the lines existence became clearly for tying them into doors.

DSCN1757 DSCN1758and I set it up as a hammock shelter, which is the reason for the zipper to be where it is, and it is very much a minimal coverage shelter on the ends, I may add two triangle pieces of Coyote Brown material to the ends, so that I can have more overhead coverage.

DSCN1759 DSCN1760 DSCN1761I haven’t spent a night in the hammock yet, and I will be doing some adjustment to the ridge lines of both the shelter and the hammock structural ridge line.

Hope you guys enjoyed this post! 🙂

Modified sleeping bag into a hammock underquilt, and a tarp shelter set up

Modified this $7 thrift store find, a Greatland brand Camo sleeping bag, I think it’s rated to 40 degrees; 72″x60″ size, full two way zipper….. added suspension loops and shock cord channels to the short ends in order to provide me with a way to hang it around my hammock 🙂  since the zippers are intact, I can add another sleeping bag to it and stack them under the hammock to provide me with additional warmth if I need to. .

 

Detail of Underquilt mount

close up of end on the hammock; showing the bungee hooked into the suspension and the channel cinching the end to prevent drafts  Underquilt

the underquilt on the hammock, it is pretty comfortable, laid in it for a few hours without needing a top quilt or additional warmth…temps yesterday were high 40s , low 50s I think. Underquilt Laid out

showing the width of the underquilt, with the segmented channels and the loops, instead of folding the 2.25″ webbing into half, I wanted it flat so that it still can be used as a sleeping bag. Underquilt shock cord channel and bungee mount

close up of the channel and the suspension loop

and the tarp shelter, it is a simple rectangle tarp, rigged so that instead of a pure rectangle with open ends, it is similar to a folded Hex shelter with corners being utilized as doors, and using a total of 4 stakes, one on each long side with V guy-lines, and one under the doors to keep them closed; it’s not long enough to cover the hammock suspension..but its enough to cover the hammock itself…

Rectangle Tarp rigged Hex style Rectangle Tarp Hex style side