Bushcraft USA 10×10 tarp set ups and one tree hammock hanging system!

Recently acquired a Bushcraft Outfitters, USA (BCUSA) 10 ft by 10 ft coyote tarp in a forum deal! It was damaged with a tab broken off, I got the tab repaired… anyhow… DSCN2338

Coyote Brown BCUSA tarp in brown stuff sack next to el-cheapo pencil organizer that houses my lighter smaller Long Ogee tarp.

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Damaged tab repaired, I used 1″ Cross- Grain ribbon as the reinforcement material and stitched lines to make sure it aint ever coming off!

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Initial set up, Diamond fly configuration with ski poles, 2 stakes only! a little slack in the material but that’s expected of nylon fabric..

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With two hammocks, more than enough space in there…. I know, I hung the hammocks too low like low hanging fruit but it’s just to give one an impression of the space available..

And with this tarp, I’ve decided I wanted to see how it would look in a vastly different configuration than most of the normal square tarp set ups…the basic layout is the same for the next 3 set ups, just the differences are all in the ridge line tie out location and the configuration of the front opening.

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Front view of the tarp tent set up;

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Back view of the set up, What I did is to stake the back wall down first, and then square up the side corners so that the tabs, which are evenly spaced at 2.5 ft between tie out tabs, are able to be staked down at the same locations, and then from that point between the center and the outermost stake, line up the front corners of the shelter to make a rectangle floor print of 5 ft wide and 7.5 feet long.

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Side view. After I stake the sides/corners down, I then raised the front peak up as far as I could do, and then attached the two tarp clips at the points where I wanted to raise the roof/wall points on the back, to make for a nearly vertical rear wall, and then ran the lines to the ski poles and staked them down. Finally, I run the clothesline ridge line through the ridge seam tabs on the tarp and raised the rear peak up, and tied the end of the line to an overhanging branch. This in effect gives the shelter a house like roof from which rainwater will shed very well, and with the vertical walls, gives one a feeling of increased space compared to a typical A- frame.

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Having seen something similar on a same size tarp, I decided to see if it would work with the ridge line peak tie out moved back 2.5 feet to the next tie out tab on the ridge seam..and bungee’d the resulting corners to bring the front down as far as I could… I disliked this set up because it robs the interior of space, and essentially makes it more a shelter you can only lay diagonally, as opposed to straight up and down.

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Another view of the terrible layout. It might be OK if I had done this with the back being a normal A-frame back though.

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So, keeping the same ridge line tab tied out, I decided to see what would happen if I pulled the corners the other way..and supported them with leaning poles and guy lines… this was the result. A much much better set up, and one that gives me the most spacious feel of the interior, PLUS the protection from almost all angles, the front opening is only 2.5 feet tall and 5 feet wide, a poncho or a small 5×7 tarp folded in half would have provided a great awning/door..One could also put a small piece of bug netting on that area and be fine for bug season…

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The side view of it. It is essentially now a doghouse shaped shelter, and with the amount of room up front now that the gable is pulled further out, one could have a good space for cooking/gear and still be protected from the elements inside.

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Rear view of the Doghouse shelter, again it is showing the rear wall layout, but also, you can see how much more open the front part looks to be compared to the first triangular opening shelter.. And the only two changes from that is the relocation of the ridge line peak tie out point and the addition of two tie out/pole points on the front sides.

With the tarp clips relocated to exactly 2.5 ft from the corners and in line with the side tabs and the ridge tab, I would say the shelter is basically a small wall tent with a front opening.
And now for something quite different! Here’s the one tree hammock stand!

One Tree Hammock stand stuff

First, these are the materials you need, from top to bottom;

a hammock obviously, with suspension.

an USGI General Purpose, Medium Tent center pole, telescoping, and it goes out to 10something feet, so if you ever need to have a visual cue on “not touching this with a 10ft pole”, this is it!

then the camo straps which are for both the hammock attachment and a ridge line in between the one tree and the pole,

then finally, a set of 4 cargo straps with 10″ nail style stakes larksheaded to their ends and tied to each other at their centers.

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Hook up the ridge line with the camo straps, then position army pole, only extended halfway, then run the 4 green straps down to the ground, and nail them securely at a 45 degree angle.. the pole is not vertical, because that is not what you want, you want as much of the hammock load to be on the pole, and less on the lines, so angling the pole out that its around 50-60 degrees from vertical, and then make sure its not going anywhere.. then stake the lines as far as possible.. this in effect gives you a tension based system..

finally, hook up the hammock to the pole and tree strap.

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Another view of the system, with my massive lumbar pack hanging off a steel hook I mounted on the tree strap. Sharp eyed readers will note that I have a whoopie sling in between the two straps on the ridge line, this is to make it easy to maintain tension…

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With the 10×10 tarp set up in an almost ordinary set up… first I put the side up with the poles, then I staked the center of the other side to make a half-diamond shape..then I staked out the “door” sides on the covered side. This gives me a good balance of wind proofing from one side, and yet a nice porch mode on the other side… with the amount of space in there, I can have a 2nd hammock underneath if I dare do so, or an army cot, or a camp chair or two..

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Side view of the set up. I did not stake the lefthand door as close to the ground as the other side is, but it still works here. With the short hammock ridge line, the 10 ft tarp covers me very well…only problem is the gear hanging out in the rain, but a poncho over it will give it the protection it needs.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

Pole mod for the Long Ogee Tarp!

Decided to see how tent pole sections work with the Long Ogee tarp over a hammock!

4 sections of ~21″ tent pole with shock cord; tied to tie outs via Paracord

Long Ogee Tent Pole Mod 1

It looks like the ENO DryFly with doors… only 4 stakes!

Long Ogee Tent Pole Mod 2

Sideways view; I used the green tree straps with hooks for the tarp attachment, and did a truckers hitch on one side to get it taut.

Long Ogee Tent Pole Mod 3

how it looks from the inside, with whoopie sling attached to tree strap;

Long Ogee Tent Pole Mod 4

Sorry for little blurry pic, I couldn’t find my mitten hooks or webbing pockets, so I used the paracord sections to tie the pole sections to the tie outs

Long Ogee Tent Pole Mod 5

View of the interior from the hammock.

Long Ogee tarp, 5 alternate set ups!

Decided to do 5 different set ups with this one tarp!

Long Ogee Alt Set up 1A

A-frame with gables; same tarp, turned 90 degrees, and staked at 4 points!

Long Ogee Alt Set up 1B

Another view of the A-frame set up. Could also be used for hammocking!

Long Ogee Alt Set up 1C

Sideways view

Long Ogee Alt Set up 2A

Ground mode; drop one end down to the ground and move two stakes to the center loops; this is roomy and low.

Long Ogee Alt Set up 2B

view of the interior of the ground mode. it kinda looks like a wing or something.

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Different ground mode set up; this time using the long ridge line

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3 stakes on the back plus the two side wing stakes. should be enough room for 2 people plus their gear…

Long Ogee Alt set up 4A

similar set up, with same number of stakes, different locations, plus the poles and their guy lines

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Angled view of the alt set up.

Long Ogee Alt Set up 4C

basically a modified diamond set up; the 2 corner stakes from the previous set up has been moved to the tie outs where the triangles attach to the main panel.

Long Ogee Alt set up 5A

Here is a much smaller, more protected set up. Basically half a Pup tent and half an A-frame tent. The extra material to one side of the two triangles have been folded under after staking down the corners.

Long Ogee Alt Set up 5B

Another view, you can see that the head and foot ends are not totally covered from one side, but they are covered amply by the triangles. I could move the awning up to another set of poles if I wanted to.

Long Ogee Alt Set up 5C

View to the inside of this small set up. In theory, two people could share the space, but realistically its great for one person and his/her gear.

Hope you enjoyed this post! 🙂

Long Ogee Batwing tarp done!

After ordering 6 yards of 58″ wide fabric and 3/4″ crosgrain webbing from [url]www.ripstopbytheroll.com[/url] ; I went and made a longer/larger version of the Ogee Batwing tarp! Took me several hours of cutting, and then sewing the hems and attaching tie outs, but I think the end result is pretty decent! I received 18 feet 8 inches of fabric, so that allowed me a little more latitude for the ridge line length and overall width…

Specs are as follows;

1.1 Oz Khaki Silnylon, 6 yards

16 tie outs of 3/4″ crosgrain webbing, sewn to hems with straight stitches, 4 lines minimum, some tie outs are X-in-box attached (corners and ridgeline tie outs)

overall length, roughly 18 feet 4 inches, width, roughly 11 feet 4 inches

Long Ogee Tarp 1

Set up with poles, I set it up first with one triangle staked down, then the poles, then the final triangle staked down, and then attached guy lines to open up the ends and stake the doors down. In a camping situation, I would start with ridgeline first, and tension it as much as possible, before staking the sides down.

Long Ogee tarp 2

end view

Tieout detail

side tie out detail; it’s stitched right into the hems

Tarp pouch 4.5x4.5x3

Amazingly, the entire tarp all fits into this 4.5″x4.5″x3″ shotgun ammo pouch, also made by me!  No guylines and no stakes, those would travel in a different pouch.

Tarp Shelter layouts and set ups!

Decided to go and do several different tarp shelter designs and layouts with the 5×7 tarp, Bat wing tarp, 9×7 tarp, and the latest 10×14 tarp I recently got!

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Flying Diamond pitch, Harbor Freight 5×7 tarp;

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Windward side view, first, tie upper corner to tree or post, then stake diagonal opposing corner down, then stake remaining two corners to make a wind break

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Another view of the Flying Diamond pitch with the 5×7 tarp, it does not provide much protection from rain, but is good for sun shade and possibly as a fire reflector using a pole to support the high corner.

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Batwing tarp in a symmetric diamond pitch with doors staked out on one side.

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Quarter view on windward side, the doors on the ground corner have been folded under, thus turning this tarp into a rhombus of 9 ft ridge line and 7 ft width.

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Head on windward view, the rhombus shape is all too readily apparent here, I think this is a good one man shelter, maybe two if the two people like cuddling together.

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Detail of doors on the pole side. Since the doors are not exactly vertical from the peak, they will go out past the pole or tree, and I might add tarp tie outs on the junction between the doors and the sides, so as to provide a place to stake out further, or suspend between two poles or trees.

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Another 5×7 tarp set up, Low Tetra pyramid…or “Dead Man’s bivy bag” set up due to its tiny size.

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The height of this is around 30 inches, while the width is 60 inches at the far end, and a floor length of 7 feet. This is NOT an ideal shelter for tall people, but for the average user or shorter, it would be a survivable shelter with protection from most elements.

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Windward view, one could make it feel bigger by adding a tie out/panel pull out where the sticker is on this tarp.

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Half-Pyramid open faced shelter utilizing the tan 9×7 tarp and suspended from a Douglas Fir branch.

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Windward view of the tarp shelter

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Tree side view, that is a 5×7 tarp as the ground cover, and there is plenty of room in there for up to 3 people. Best with two and gear, and with a metal pole or similar, one could have a fire in front of the pyramid shelter and be comfortable.

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Interior view with ground cloth and my MOLLE pack in there.

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10×14 tarp set up in a 6×8 narrow pyramid with approx 7 ft height.

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View of door side with door flaps closed up.

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Interior view showing the basic fold of corners and the space given.

Basically one puts tarp clips 3 feet from the corner of the door flaps, for the front, and then put tarp clips an approximate distance (in this case, 4 feet) from the corners on the back to make a 6 ft width between the back two clips, and thus providing just around 8 ft of length between the front and the back after squaring up the stake points.

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With 9×12 tarp erected using 5 more pole sections as an awning.

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Not quite lined up I know, but this gives good space under which to dine or cook or hang around in weather.

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A different pyramid set up, this oddly enough gives me a bigger floor space than the narrow one above, the doors are now 4 feet wide, and the back edge is now 8 feet wide..there is a 6×8 tarp in there, and according to my calculations and confirmed with this set up, I have a floor of 8 ft wide and 6 feet 6 inches length, thus providing me with more useful room in the shelter. Same 7 ft approximate height.

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Closed up, basically weather proof. I could cut a hole in there for a stovepipe but I do not have a stove with pipe yet.

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Side view of Leaning/half Pyramid set up.

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Windward-quarter view, showing the better pyramid shaping compared to the narrow one.

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All packed up save for the pole. I might splurge for a backpacking tarp pole if it means a smaller package than that shown above. Both the 10×14 tarp and the 6×8 ground tarp are rolled up in the bag, along with the stakes and the single long line.

Hope you enjoyed this post!

Vintage pack suspension system update, and picked up a good tarp!

Decided I wanted to add a centering strap to my Academy Broadway’s modded suspension system so that it stays in one place instead of being quite floppy….its simply a 1.5″ wide nylon belt threaded through the center piece and attached to the two bars where the straps are attached to…wearing it, I do not notice it at all! With a 22 pound base load without water, it feels very comfortable…DSCN2105 Showing the centering strap

DSCN2101 How the pack sits on me, and how the straps goes down following my back to the mounting points on the lower bar, it also shows the load lifter as it should be used;

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Another view of the set up, but from the side. I realize the load lifters aren’t at the “magic 45 degree” angle, but it is comfortable and I do not feel overburdened.

I also picked up a 9×7 rubberized nylon tarp….it only has 8 grommets, and is thinner than my USGI poncho, but heavier than the silnylon tarp I have….it is in a shade very close to that of Coyote Tan, though according to an older backpacker, it was available at REI and other outfitters in the 80s as a lightweight alternative to the poly plastic tarps and canvas tarps at that time.

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Laid out flat

20140915_133806Showing the material on both top and bottom side

20140915_132316Set up over the 2-man bug tent and hiking poles (improvised from ski poles)

20140915_132306View from the front, the fabric sags pretty heavily in this set up…

20140915_132332From the side, it covers all of the bug screening, and there is plenty of room in between the front/back and the tarp, one could move it back a little and have a porch/awning to store gear under.

20140915_133410I think this is the better set up, no spots for water to pool under…I might modify the bug tent to have only two side pull outs instead of four…so that I can use the same stakes on the sides as the diamond with door pitch uses….

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Side view of the diamond with door pitch;

20140915_132407Center seam on the ridge; I think this is likely the reason for the sagging..not sure myself…

20140915_132414Hiking/Ski poles used to support the tarp. it is the perfect size to hold up through the grommets…I will be getting rubber feet or tip protectors for them so as not to scratch rocks when hiking/backpacking…

And here are the two packs packed up for 3-4 days with the significant other…… minus water.

 

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I am carrying a Full size air mattress plus wool blanket and canteens in the top, clothes in middle, sleeping bag in bottom, food in front large pocket, extra rope in one pocket, fire starting kit in small pocket, first aid kit in other pocket, with the last large pocket being available for miscellaneous things, while her red pack carries her sleeping bag, the bug tent and the tan tarp with stakes, food in side pockets with room for miscellaneous items, canteens in the main compartment with her clothes underneath the sleeping bag…weights are as follows, my big green one is 22 pounds without water, her red bag is 17 pounds without water…a difference of 5 pounds which could be attributed to the wool blanket and heavier clothes, since she is basically half my size.

Tested modified bug tent, and made hammock bug net!

Modified an old Stansports A-frame “Scout backpacking” tent that was not waterproof into a bug tent to be more airy…it is 54″ wide by 78″ long, and 36″ tall…. Unlike the original tent design, I added two more tie-outs on the sides, so that I could expand the feel of the tent and make it more spacious compared to original design. I was able to test it with the girlfriend on an overnighter in the Willamette National Forest. It is comfortable and very airy..perfect for the summertime! We put a Twin size air mattress in the tent, there’s still enough room for small gear on the sides, though ideally a Full size air mattress at 54″ wide would be preferable for two people so as not to risk rolling off the air mattress and landing on the ground. With the relative lack of privacy in the bug tent, we set up another small tent, a dome tent for use as changing room, and as back up tent should we need it.

Also made a bug net for my hammock, these pics are of it before I added another section of bug netting to extend it….and the stuff sack holds everything for hammock except tarp and tarp lines/stakes.

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Campsite on NFS 4695 past Humbug Campground; yes that is an army cot in the foreground, I forgot to bring proper chairs so we used that by the fire 🙂

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Another view of campsite, the tarp BARELY covers the tent, for rain, I would probably use a larger tarp.

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The bug tent under the bat wing tarp, the girl is in the tent testing it. I utilized a couple long poles for the support of the tent and tarp, if needed, one could dispense with them and use trekking poles or pitch from trees. The bug netting is 59×84 panel of polyester sheer curtain material from Kmart; I decided one panel is all it needed to make the tent a bug tent.

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Hammock bug net made of two panels of the same polyester sheer curtain material; shown with the under pad and the hammock; not shown is the new extension panel I added to it due to it being too small for the hammock really….. (accidentally ripped one side’s hole a bit bigger…)

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Hammock stuff stuffed into MSS bag; yes that is how bulky it is when not compressed; open cell underpad, top quilt, hammock, bug net, suspension straps are all in there. only the tarp stuff is separate.

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Nice thing about the MSS bag; the 9 strap compression system helps compress the stuff into this basketball sized unit…though on my pack, I don;t compress it as far, since I need it to be slimmer so that my MOLLE pouches and straps will fit.

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A view of the creek next to the campsite 🙂 This creek, I’m not sure which one it is, but it feeds Brietenbush River which feeds into Detroit Lake from the mountain springs.

DSCN2063Another view of the creek, water is ice cold….brrr.

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DSCN2065Started a twig fire underneath a rotten log end that someone left behind.

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The stump getting on fire….it lasted for about 10-12 hours…..we had hot dogs for dinner that night 😀

 

 

 

Trip report; Slide Creek camping

SO I am back from a weekend camping out in Slide Creek area in Oregon, part of the Santiam State Forest/Willamette National Forest; a weekend with friends, and a test of the Bat Wing tarp and DIY hammock! I must say, I had a great time!DSCN1852The view of the camp site; my hammock tarp is somewhere to the right in the woods;

DSCN1853Slide Creek from the camp site

DSCN1854My hammock tarp camp site; the trees are barely over 12 feet apart; and I only used two stakes; tied the corners of the ends to the trees

DSCN1855with vinyl ground cloth and my pack and Gilmour bow saw to process dead fall wood for fire

DSCN1876The view inside the tarp; that is my USGI Intermediate Cold weather sleeping bag; I have a blue camp pad inside to keep me insulated on the bottom.

DSCN1856looking out to the parking area and National Forest Road 4695; which leads to Brietenbush Road

DSCN1857a trail going into the woods; beautiful scenery!

DSCN1858the Sun shining through;

DSCN1867here be life and dead wood; such is beautiful woodland.

DSCN1864the natural bridge made by felled trees; these trees fell down from a windstorm a while back, a few have been cut in order to provide some firewood; but the majority are left alone

DSCN1866the root base of one of the bridging trees; it is a large base, and provides a good shelter for animals and critters; the ground is so very rocky

DSCN1868one of the Russula mushrooms; I am not sure which species of Russula this one is;

DSCN1870a Western Trillium that’s aged; it is a beautiful flowering plant

DSCN1873a Fairy Slipper; one of the native Orchids in the Oregon/Pacific NW woodlands

DSCN1871a small tree sprouting out of a large dead stump

DSCN1872further up Slide creek; there is evidence of rock slides and bank erosion from storms

DSCN1878A couple of Harlequin Ducks!

DSCN1879another shot of the Harlequin Ducks

DSCN1860Bushcrafting with my vintage Colonial Bowie

DSCN1861and again with the Buck 103 Skinner; making great curling chips

DSCN1863making a tinder stick with the Imperial Ireland small knife

DSCN1875making another tinder stick with the Imperial R.I. bowie knife; it carves pretty good on white pine

DSCN1859A cup of hot chocolate over an Esbit stove

DSCN1862the campground fire pit; modified a little bit so that there’s a draft and a way to feed the large logs into the fire; they are all dead fall/dead logs

The weather was a typical Oregon springtime weather; spots of sun and lots of showers, overnight temps went down to the 40s; and I was toasty warm in the USGI Intermediate Cold Mummy bag and pad; the tarp kept me and my gear dry!

Redid my hammock shelter into a minimalist tarp!

SO like the previous post said, my attempt failed at an integrated hammock shelter/bug shelter/ under cover…….

so I took it all apart, and did a few sketches and made a plan; Bat-Wing Tarp designIts based off of Hammock Forums’ member Gargoyle’s Ogee Tarp; and built using just the 55″x144″ material I have on hand;

it is now a very light, compact tarp, I will need to redo my hammock suspension so that I can put the tarp closer to the body of the hammock..

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 1the tarp over my hammock, it looks like a bat wing doesn’t it!?Bat-Wing Tarp Design 2angled view of the tarp

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 3head on view of the tarp, yes it is narrow, and that is the door/beak corner system

Bat-Wing Tarp Design 4 Close Upclose up of the triangle parts, I have an extra tie out there in case I want to do a tent pole spreader mod so that it opens up more on the inside.

Bat-Wing Tarp and Hammock  belt kitthe whole system; I now need to figure out the stakes/guy line situation as to how to pack them without getting the hammock dirty..,might use an USGI M16 cleaning kit pouch? the pouch on the far right holds my tarp, yes that is right, it packs down ridiculously small! the SAW ammo pouch holds the hammock, and the other small pouch holds the suspension parts, these two small pouches were my prototypes for the SKS ammo clip pouches.

 

Hammock Shelter; SIlnylon and Ripstop and No See Um mesh….whoops!

Well here we go!

Sewn up another hammock shelter; this time out of 4 yards of Silicon impregnated nylon and 4 yards of Durable Water Repellent Nylon ; and two triangles of No See Um mesh; DSCN1841First hang; no weight in the hammock, it looks OK…a little IFFY on the triangle windows..

DSCN1842Triangle windows of no see um mesh. You can see the stress being put on the top of the triangle from the hammock suspension..and this is unloaded hammock.

 

so after putting SOME weight in the hammock, it ripped where one of the triangle windows were……SO…. looks like I will be taking the windows off, and then trying again and see if it will still work…..if not, then take it all apart and sew on another 4 yards of Silicon Nylon and make a 12 ft long rectangle tarp with no bottom parts or anything.